American existentialist philosopher William Earle (1919-1988) famously declared, “If your outgo exceeds your income, then your upkeep will be your downfall.” This basic tenant of personal financial responsibility seems forgotten by many, given the reality of how many people cannot scrape tog…

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When Lois Pattillo purchased Donaldson-Bannister Farm, the property was 26 acres and included the house that still stands at the corner of Chamblee Dunwoody Road and Vermack Road. The land extended along Vermack Road past what is now Vermack Ridge and Vermack Swim and Tennis. One of the chan…

Remember Farrah Fawcett, the glamorous star of the ’70s television hit, “Charlie’s Angels?” Married for a time to Lee Majors, star of the action series “The Six Million Dollar Man,” Fawcett became one of America’s favorite pin-up models. The July 4, 1977, People magazine cover featured the b…

Until I got married 20 years ago, I didn’t watch much TV. Perhaps because I liked to read and was always in the bed no later than 9 — yes, really — I was never up late enough for the good shows. And this was before TIVO and other DVRs. I’d get home from work around 7, maybe jog a few miles, …

If you enjoy seeing the historic 1906 Cheek/Spruill Farmhouse at the corner of Mount Vernon Road and Chamblee Dunwoody Road, consider the efforts that went into saving it from demolition. 

The warmer and longer days of summer are conducive to a relaxed mindset, and perhaps a summer reset.

I had a vague memory that I’d already written about our flora and fauna this year and realized I’d asked “Has spring sprung?” in a February column. Perhaps those early signs of spring were an indicator of the hot summer to come. Unlike us, the creatures that populate our personal nature pres…

On July 20th, Dunwoody Preservation Trust featured Vietnam veteran Jim Torbert as part of its History Alive series.  

I always feel as though I’m taking my life in my hands when we drive downtown during rush hour, and I’m thankful it’s not something I do often. My husband had a follow-up doctor’s visit at Emory Midtown one morning, and the first bit of good news was we made it down there without mishap.

It was a perfect question for contemplation on July 4, 2019, Independence Day, America’s 243rd birthday. Every American citizen and those who aspire to citizenship should read “Last Call for Liberty: How America’s Genius for Freedom Has Become Its Greatest Threat” by Os Guinness (InterVarsit…

July 20th will mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing with astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin. As Armstrong took his first step on the moon and said the words, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” those who watched remember whe…

This year summer officially extends from June 21 to September 23, when the fall solstice arrives. There’s an old adage about warm weather doldrums on Wall Street that counsels, “Sell in May and go away!”

As the anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing approaches, please share your memories of where you were and what you remember about that day. Do you recall watching the event on television? Which news anchor do you remember reporting on the event? Was anything else special happening in you…

Ever since the college admissions bribery scandal broke in March, I’ve wanted to write a column about my thoughts, but whenever I’d sit down to do that, I’d see yet another article about the whys and wherefores. I’d think, “What else can be said about it?”

On July 4, 1776, Congress officially adopted the Declaration of Independence which boldly declared, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pur…

You may not be old enough to recall those words as the title of a song in “Annie Get Your Gun,” but as soon as I typed them, the song sprang to mind — not that this column has anything to do with singing.  I can assure you that singing doesn’t come naturally to me, but I’ve discovered that w…

I’m always curious about the origin of street names, including Lisa Lane in Dunwoody. I had heard a story that the road was named for two sisters in the Kirby family — Lisa and Lane. Now I have confirmation of that story from Lane herself, except her name is spelled Laine. Laine Kirby Wood a…

June 15th was a beautiful day for a family reunion at Donaldson-Bannister Farm. Around 90 descendants of William J. Donaldson came to the Dunwoody farm for the reunion, traveling from Georgia, Texas, Alabama and South Carolina. Some were meeting cousins for the very first time. 

How serendipitous that I read these words as I was preparing to write this column: “Every morning is a fresh start. Wake up each morning with a thankful heart.” 

History is a great teacher if you bother to “read the minutes of the last meeting,” which many lost in the “Twitterverse” generally fail to do. In March, 1991, following the invasion of Iraq, President George H. W. Bush enjoyed a 90 percent job performance rating. Bill Clinton, a little-know…

Do you ever just need a hand but don’t know where to turn? What if you could rent a teen or two to help out around the house? You wouldn’t have to feed them, buy them cars, or pay for their college education — just rent them as needed. Well, if you live in Dunwoody, you’re in luck. You can h…

James O. Wilson, who went by Ollie, was born in Chamblee in 1896. He registered for the draft on June 5, 1917 at the A-10 precinct in Atlanta. Three months later, he married Elizabeth Delong of Dunwoody and in July of 1918 he was inducted into the military. Wilson began his training at Chamb…

The wait is agonizing. Cars are backed up for miles because of a multi-car wreck on Ga. 20 in Forsyth County. Slowly, the wreck scene is being cleared so that traffic can start back up. In one of the cars near the front of the line, 85-year-old Mary waits patiently and gets ready to move. Th…

Hometown girl Kelly (Coleman) Fletcher, a graduate of Dunwoody High, has always pursued her dream to be a performer. Marriage, motherhood and a career detour didn’t deter her. 

Brad Phillips has lived in the Roberts Drive area, north of Spalding Drive, since he moved here with his family in 1971. He remembers the old home and the well that once sat where Dunwoody Springs Elementary School is located. It was known as Obediah’s Plantation, because the original owners…

The House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed the Secure Act (Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement), 417 to 3. The bill, containing changes for

I’ve long said in reference to my 10-year stretch of regular workouts, “I live in fear that I’ll lose my workout partner and immediately fall off the wagon.”  I know myself well enough to know that I showed up two times a week because she was counting on me. The fact that I was also paying a…

In his 2018 book, “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones,” James Clear defines a habit as “a routine or practice performed regularly; an automatic response to a specific situation.” The May 15, 2019, release of Charles Schwab’s annual Modern Wealth…

Cascading roses on the arbor at Donaldson-Bannister Farm, a $150,000 endowment for education programs and future gardens at the farm. These are the legacies that Dr. Adrian Gendell Bonser left for the community of Dunwoody. 

The historic summer home that was the inspiration for the name of Happy Hollow Road and which was once known as Happy Hollow is available for purchase. The Cassidy/Lamb Home, circa 1930, at 2579 W. Fontainebleau Court, a cul-de-sac off Happy Hollow Road, has been the home of Brenda and Ken L…

As a high school and college student during most of the Vietnam War, I was consumed by the drill team, dating and studying—not the nightly news. It’s only since I’ve known my Vietnam veteran husband that I’ve learned more about the war and the toll it took on our troops and the fabric of our…

Reading the financial press, or other source of news or commentary, disparate stories may seem to have no interrelatedness whatsoever. The Wall Street Journal weekend edition (5/11-12/19) headlined, “Uber’s High-Profile IPO Slips In Weak First Session.”  A “page 2” filler piece noted, “‘Fina…

Pray you never face questions such as these. You have a power of attorney for health care for a spouse, mom, dad, grandparent, adult child or other loved one. For the sake of example, we postulate that in framing the following questions, you are the oldest daughter of three siblings. A busy …

I finally got around to a few books on my To Be Read list and one was “The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend.”  A bookshop is a central feature, almost a character, in this delightful book set in Broken Wheel, Iowa.  The back cover blurb captures it well: “A heartwarming reminder of why we a…

Several major events occurred in the U.S. in the year 1969. That was the year of the Apollo 11 moon landing and walk. It was also the year of Woodstock and the first Boeing 747 flight. Richard Nixon was president, and the Vietnam War continued.  

About three months ago, I wrote about the D-Day Squadron and their plans to return to Normandy for the 75th anniversary of D-Day. A group of pilots will fly to Normandy in restored Douglas Aircraft C-47s. Veteran Daniel McBride, a paratrooper with the 101st Airborne who will be returning to …

Were you devastated when you heard the Crier had ceased operations? Were you overjoyed to see the familiar blue-wrapped paper appear in your driveway again? Facebook and my email box were filled with comments bemoaning the demise of our beloved paper, and now, miraculously, it’s back.

While looking through some old issues of the Dunwoody Crier, I discovered an interview with Elizabeth Davis. She was principal of Dunwoody Elementary School from 1937 until 1962. The school was located where the Dunwoody Library and Spruill Center for the Arts are today, so Mrs. Davis had a …

A friend offered us a week’s stay at his cabin in Pigeon Forge and even invited the dog, so how could we refuse? We’d visited there before, once for a cowboy music festival and once for a Vietnam veterans’ reunion.  

When I received the startling announcement that the Dunwoody Crier was ceasing publication, it was sad news! The founder and publisher, Dick Williams, is a longtime friend, and I know how much he loved his paper! 

I remember when I was growing up and in kindergarten, we used to have show-and-tell. I always enjoyed that and to this day, to an extent, I still enjoy show-and-tell. In my case, in a sense, my columns are my grown-up show-and-tell. I get to share a small piece of my life with my friends, an…

If it weren’t for Dick Williams, I wouldn’t be a columnist and author today. It was the summer of 2011 when I read Managing Editor Cathy Cobb’s farewell to Dunwoody as she was moving out of state. Her reminder in that piece that Dunwoody businesses and the Crier needed the community’s suppor…

I met Dick Williams in 1998, when Austin Elementary School was staging a protest about the lack of a traffic signal in front of its Roberts Drive facility. Dick was the only member of the media who came that morning, arriving a few minutes late (not a surprise to those who know him even slig…